Mystère × Voir Why We Sleep : The New Science of Sleep and Dreams Kindle Ebook Auteur Matthew Walker

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Why We Sleep CHAPTER 1 To Sleep Do you think you got enough sleep this past week Can you recall the last time you woke up without an alarm clock feeling refreshed, not needing caffeine If the answer to either of these questions is no, you are not alone Two thirds of adults throughout all developed nations fail to obtain the recommended eight hours of nightly sleep.I I doubt you are surprised by this fact, but you may be surprised by the consequences Routinely sleeping less than six or seven hours a night demolishes your immune system, than doubling your risk of cancer Insufficient sleep is a key lifestyle factor determining whether or not you will develop Alzheimers disease Inadequate sleepeven moderate reductions for just one weekdisrupts blood sugar levels so profoundly that you would be classified as pre diabetic Short sleeping increases the likelihood of your coronary arteries becoming blocked and brittle, setting you on a path toward cardiovascular disease, stroke, and congestive heart failure Fitting Charlotte Bronts prophetic wisdom that a ruffled mind makes a restless pillow, sleep disruption further contributes to all major psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety, and suicidality Perhaps you have also noticed a desire to eat when youre tired This is no coincidence Too little sleep swells concentrations of a hormone that makes you feel hungry while suppressing a companion hormone that otherwise signals food satisfaction Despite being full, you still want to eat Its a proven recipe for weight gain in sleep deficient adults and children alike Worse, should you attempt to diet but dont get enough sleep while doing so, it is futile, since most of the weight you lose will come from lean body mass, not fat Add the above health consequences up, and a proven link becomes easier to accept the shorter your sleep, the shorter your life span The old maxim Ill sleep when Im dead is therefore unfortunate Adopt this mind set, and you will be dead sooner and the quality of that shorter life will be worse The elastic band of sleep deprivation can stretch only so far before it snaps Sadly, human beings are in fact the only species that will deliberately deprive themselves of sleep without legitimate gain Every component of wellness, and countless seams of societal fabric, are being eroded by our costly state of sleep neglect human and financial alike So much so that the World Health Organization WHO has now declared a sleep loss epidemic throughout industrialized nations.II It is no coincidence that countries where sleep time has declined most dramatically over the past century, such as the US, the UK, Japan, and South Korea, and several in western Europe, are also those suffering the greatest increase in rates of the aforementioned physical diseases and mental disorders Scientists such as myself have even started lobbying doctors to start prescribing sleep As medical advice goes, its perhaps the most painless and enjoyable to follow Do not, however, mistake this as a plea to doctors to start prescribing sleeping pillsquite the opposite, in fact, considering the alarming evidence surrounding the deleterious health consequences of these drugs But can we go so far as to say that a lack of sleep can kill you outright Actually, yeson at least two counts First, there is a very rare genetic disorder that starts with a progressive insomnia, emerging in midlife Several months into the disease course, the patient stops sleeping altogether By this stage, they have started to lose many basic brain and body functions No drugs that we currently have will help the patient sleep After twelve to eighteen months of no sleep, the patient will die Though exceedingly rare, this disorder asserts that a lack of sleep can kill a human being Second is the deadly circumstance of getting behind the wheel of a motor vehicle without having had sufficient sleep Drowsy driving is the cause of hundreds of thousands of traffic accidents and fatalities each year And here, it is not only the life of the sleep deprived individuals that is at risk, but the lives of those around them Tragically, one person dies in a traffic accident every hour in the United States due to a fatigue related error It is disquieting to learn that vehicular accidents caused by drowsy driving exceed those caused by alcohol and drugs combined Societys apathy toward sleep has, in part, been caused by the historic failure of science to explain why we need it Sleep remained one of the last great biological mysteries All of the mighty problem solving methods in sciencegenetics, molecular biology, and high powered digital technologyhave been unable to unlock the stubborn vault of sleep Minds of the most stringent kind, including Nobel Prizewinner Francis Crick, who deduced the twisted ladder structure of DNA, famed Roman educator and rhetorician Quintilian, and even Sigmund Freud had all tried their hand at deciphering sleeps enigmatic code, all in vain To better frame this state of prior scientific ignorance, imagine the birth of your first child At the hospital, the doctor enters the room and says, Congratulations, its a healthy baby boy Weve completed all of the preliminary tests and everything looks good She smiles reassuringly and starts walking toward the door However, before exiting the room she turns around and says, There is just one thing From this moment forth, and for the rest of your childs entire life, he will repeatedly and routinely lapse into a state of apparent coma It might even resemble death at times And while his body lies still his mind will often be filled with stunning, bizarre hallucinations This state will consume one third of his life and I have absolutely no idea why hell do it, or what it is for Good luck Astonishing, but until very recently, this was reality doctors and scientists could not give you a consistent or complete answer as to why we sleep Consider that we have known the functions of the three other basic drives in lifeto eat, to drink, and to reproducefor many tens if not hundreds of years now Yet the fourth main biological drive, common across the entire animal kingdomthe drive to sleephas continued to elude science for millennia Addressing the question of why we sleep from an evolutionary perspective only compounds the mystery No matter what vantage point you take, sleep would appear to be the most foolish of biological phenomena When you are asleep, you cannot gather food You cannot socialize You cannot find a mate and reproduce You cannot nurture or protect your offspring Worse still, sleep leaves you vulnerable to predation Sleep is surely one of the most puzzling of all human behaviors On any one of these groundsnever mind all of them in combinationthere ought to have been a strong evolutionary pressure to prevent the emergence of sleep or anything remotely like it As one sleep scientist has said, If sleep does not serve an absolutely vital function, then it is the biggest mistake the evolutionary process has ever made.III Yet sleep has persisted Heroically so Indeed, every species studied to date sleeps.IV This simple fact establishes that sleep evolved withor very soon afterlife itself on our planet Moreover, the subsequent perseverance of sleep throughout evolution means there must be tremendous benefits that far outweigh all of the obvious hazards and detriments Ultimately, asking Why do we sleep was the wrong question It implied there was a single function, one holy grail of a reason that we slept, and we went in search of it Theories ranged from the logical a time for conserving energy , to the peculiar an opportunity for eyeball oxygenation , to the psychoanalytic a non conscious state in which we fulfill repressed wishes This book will reveal a very different truth sleep is infinitely complex, profoundly interesting, and alarmingly health relevant We sleep for a rich litany of functions, pluralan abundant constellation of nighttime benefits that service both our brains and our bodies There does not seem to be one major organ within the body, or process within the brain, that isnt optimally enhanced by sleep and detrimentally impaired when we dont get enough That we receive such a bounty of health benefits each night should not be surprising After all, we are awake for two thirds of our lives, and we dont just achieve one useful thing during that stretch of time We accomplish myriad undertakings that promote our own well being and survival Why, then, would we expect sleepand the twenty five to thirty years, on average, it takes from our livesto offer one function only Through an explosion of discoveries over the past twenty years, we have come to realize that evolution did not make a spectacular blunder in conceiving of sleep Sleep dispenses a multitude of health ensuring benefits, yours to pick up in repeat prescription every twenty four hours, should you choose Many dont Within the brain, sleep enriches a diversity of functions, including our ability to learn, memorize, and make logical decisions and choices Benevolently servicing our psychological health, sleep recalibrates our emotional brain circuits, allowing us to navigate next day social and psychological challenges with cool headed composure We are even beginning to understand the most impervious and controversial of all conscious experiences the dream Dreaming provides a unique suite of benefits to all species fortunate enough to experience it, humans included Among these gifts are a consoling neurochemical bath that mollifies painful memories and a virtual reality space in which the brain melds past and present knowledge, inspiring creativity Downstairs in the body, sleep restocks the armory of our immune system, helping fight malignancy, preventing infection, and warding off all manner of sickness Sleep reforms the bodys metabolic state by fine tuning the balance of insulin and circulating glucose Sleep further regulates our appetite, helping control body weight through healthy food selection rather than rash impulsivity Plentiful sleep maintains a flourishing microbiome within your gut from which we know so much of our nutritional health begins Adequate sleep is intimately tied to the fitness of our cardiovascular system, lowering blood pressure while keeping our hearts in fine condition A balanced diet and exercise are of vital importance, yes But we now see sleep as the preeminent force in this health trinity The physical and mental impairments caused by one night of bad sleep dwarf those caused by an equivalent absence of food or exercise It is difficult to imagine any other statenatural or medically manipulatedthat affords a powerful redressing of physical and mental health at every level of analysis Based on a rich, new scientific understanding of sleep, we no longer have to ask what sleep is good for Instead, we are now forced to wonder whether there are any biological functions that do not benefit by a good nights sleep So far, the results of thousands of studies insist that no, there arent Emerging from this research renaissance is an unequivocal message sleep is the single most effective thing we can do to reset our brain and body health each dayMother Natures best effort yet at contra death Unfortunately, the real evidence that makes clear all of the dangers that befall individuals and societies when sleep becomes short have not been clearly telegraphed to the public It is the most glaring omission in the contemporary health conversation In response, this book is intended to serve as a scientifically accurate intervention addressing this unmet need, and what I hope is a fascinating journey of discoveries It aims to revise our cultural appreciation of sleep, and reverse our neglect of it Personally, I should note that I am in love with sleep not just my own, though I do give myself a non negotiable eight hour sleep opportunity each night I am in love with everything sleep is and does I am in love with discovering all that remains unknown about it I am in love with communicating the astonishing brilliance of it to the public I am in love with finding any and all methods for reuniting humanity with the sleep it so desperately needs This love affair has now spanned a twenty plus year research career that began when I was a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and continues now that I am a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley It was not, however, love at first sight I am an accidental sleep researcher It was never my intent to inhabit this esoteric outer territory of science At age eighteen I went to study at the Queens Medical Center in England a prodigious institute in Nottingham boasting a wonderful band of brain scientists on its faculty Ultimately, medicine wasnt for me, as it seemed concerned with answers, whereas I was always enthralled by questions For me, answers were simply a way to get to the next question I decided to study neuroscience, and after graduating, obtained my PhD in neurophysiology supported by a fellowship from Englands Medical Research Council, London It was during my PhD work that I began making my first real scientific contributions in the field of sleep research I was examining patterns of electrical brainwave activity in older adults in the early stages of dementia Counter to common belief, there isnt just one type of dementia Alzheimers disease is the most common, but is only one of many types For a number of treatment reasons, it is critical to know which type of dementia an individual is suffering from as soon as possible I began assessing brainwave activity from my patients during wake and sleep My hypothesis there was a unique and specific electrical brain signature that could forecast which dementia subtype each individual was progressing toward Measurements taken during the day were ambiguous, with no clear signature of difference to be found Only in the nighttime ocean of sleeping brainwaves did the recordings speak out a clear labeling of my patients saddening disease fate The discovery proved that sleep could potentially be used as a new early diagnostic litmus test to understand which type of dementia an individual would develop Sleep became my obsession The answer it had provided me, like all good answers, only led to fascinating questions, among them Was the disruption of sleep in my patients actually contributing to the diseases they were suffering from, and even causing some of their terrible symptoms, such as memory loss, aggression, hallucinations, delusions I read all I could A scarcely believable truth began to emergenobody actually knew the clear reason why we needed sleep, and what it does I could not answer my own question about dementia if this fundamental first question remained unanswered I decided I would try to crack the code of sleep I halted my research in dementia and, for a post doctoral position that took me across the Atlantic Ocean to Harvard, set about addressing one of the most enigmatic puzzles of humanityone that had eluded some of the best scientists in history Why do we sleep With genuine navet, not hubris, I believed I would find the answer within two years That was twenty years ago Hard problems care little about what motivates their interrogators they meter out their lessons of difficulty all the same Now, after two decades of my own research efforts, combined with thousands of studies from other laboratories around the world, we have many of the answers These discoveries have taken me on wonderful, privileged, and unexpected journeys inside and outside of academiafrom being a sleep consultant for the NBA, NFL, and British Premier League football teams to Pixar Animation, government agencies, and well known technology and financial companies to taking part in and helping make several mainstream television programs and documentaries These sleep revelations, together with many similar discoveries from my fellow sleep scientists, will offer all the proof you need about the vital importance of sleep A final comment on the structure of this book The chapters are written in a logical order, traversing a narrative arc in four main parts Part 1 demystifies this beguiling thing called sleep what it is, what it isnt, who sleeps, how much they sleep, how human beings should sleep but are not , and how sleep changes across your life span or that of your child, for better and for worse Part 2 details the good, the bad, and the deathly of sleep and sleep loss We will explore all of the astonishing benefits of sleep for brain and for body, affirming what a remarkable Swiss Army knife of health and wellness sleep truly is Then we turn to how and why a lack of sufficient sleep leads to a quagmire of ill health, disease, and untimely deatha wakeup call to sleep if ever there was one Part 3 offers safe passage from sleep to the fantastical world of dreams scientifically explained From peering into the brains of dreaming individuals, and precisely how dreams inspire Nobel Prizewinning ideas that transform the world, to whether or not dream control really is possible, and if such a thing is even wiseall will be revealed Part 4 seats us first at the bedside, explaining numerous sleep disorders, including insomnia I will unpack the obvious and not so obvious reasons for why so many of us find it difficult to get a good nights sleep, night after night A frank discussion of sleeping pills then follows, based on scientific and clinical data rather than hearsay or branding messages Details of new, safer, and effective non drug therapies for better sleep will then be advised Transitioning from bedside up to the level of sleep in society, we will subsequently learn of the sobering impact that insufficient sleep has in education, in medicine and health care, and in business The evidence shatters beliefs about the usefulness of long waking hours with little sleep in effectively, safely, profitably, and ethically accomplishing the goals of each of these disciplines Concluding the book with genuine optimistic hope, I lay out a road map of ideas that can reconnect humanity with the sleep it remains so bereft ofa new vision for sleep in the twenty first century I should point out that you need not read this book in this progressive, four part narrative arc Each chapter can, for the most part, be read individually, and out of order, without losing too much of its significance I therefore invite you to consume the book in whole or in part, buffet style or in order, all according to your personal taste In closing, I offer a disclaimer Should you feel drowsy and fall asleep while reading the book, unlike most authors, I will not be disheartened Indeed, based on the topic and content of this book, I am actively going to encourage that kind of behavior from you Knowing what I know about the relationship between sleep and memory, it is the greatest form of flattery for me to know that you, the reader, cannot resist the urge to strengthen and thus remember what I am telling you by falling asleep So please, feel free to ebb and flow into and out of consciousness during this entire book I will take absolutely no offense On the contrary, I would be delighted I.The World Health Organization and the National Sleep Foundation both stipulate an average of eight hours of sleep per night for adults II.Sleepless in America, National Geographic, III.Dr Allan Rechtschaffen IV.Kushida, C Encyclopedia of Sleep, Volume 1 Elsever, 2013 Ce texte fait r f rence l dition Broch.A thoughtful tour through the still dimly understood state of being asleep Why We Sleepis a book on a mission Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too And it is urgent He makes the argument, persuasively, that we are in the midst of a silent sleep loss epidemic that poses the greatest public health challenge we face in the 21st century Why We Sleepmounts a persuasive, exuberant case for addressing our societal sleep deficit and for the virtues of sleep itself It is recommended for night table reading in the most pragmatic sense New York Times Book ReviewThe director of UC Berkeleys Sleep and Neuroimaging Lab explores the purpose of slumber Understanding the why, it turns out, just might help you with the how to PeopleA neuroscientist has found a revolutionary way of being cleverer, attractive, slimmer, happier, healthier and of warding off cancer a good nights shut eye Its probably a little too soon to tell you that Why We Sleepsaved my life, but I can tell you that its been an eye opener The GuardianThis is a stimulating and important book which you should read in the knowledge that the author is, as he puts it, in love with everything that sleep is and does But please do not begin it just before bedtime Financial TimesFascinating Walker describes how our resting habits have changed throughout history the connection between sleep, chronic disease, and life span and why the pills and aids we use to sleep longer and deeper are actually making our nights worse Most important, he gives us simple, actionable ways to get better resttonight Mens JournalWalker is a scientist but writes for the layperson, illustrating tricky concepts with easily grasped analogies Of particular interest to business owners, educators, parents, and government officials, and anyone who has ever suffered from a poor nights sleep Library Journal,starred review Why We Sleepis simply a must read World renowned neuroscientist and sleep expert Matthew Walker takes us on a fascinating andindispensablejourney into the latest understandings of the science ofsleep And the book goes way beyond satisfying intellectual curiosity, as it explores the cognitive, health, safety and business consequences of compromising the quality and quantity of our sleep insights that may change the way you live yourlife In these super charged, distracting times it is hard to think of a book that is important to read than this one Adam Gazzaley, co author of The Distracted Mind, founder and executive director of Neuroscape, and Professor of Neurology, Physiology, and Psychiatry at University of California, San Francisco Most of us have no idea what we do with a third of our lives In this lucid and engaging book, Matt Walker explains the new science that is rapidly solving this age old mystery Why We Sleep is a canny pleasure that will have you turning pages well past your bedtime Daniel Gilbert, professor of psychology at Harvard and author of Stumbling on Happiness In Why We Sleep, Dr Matt Walker brilliantly illuminates the night, explaining how sleep can make us healthier, safer, smarter, and productive Clearly and definitively, he provides knowledge and strategies to overcome the life threatening risks associated with our sleep deprived society Our universal need for sleep ensures that every reader will find value in Dr Walkers insightful counsel Mark R Rosekind, Ph.D., former NHTSA Administrator, NTSB member, and NASA scientist Ce texte fait r f rence l dition Broch Why sleep is important and what happens when you Oct , An individual s need for sleep varies, but the consequences of not getting enough sleep can include drug, tobacco and alcohol abuse, nightmares and sleep terrors, poor decision making, reduced learning at school and traffic accidents QA Why Is Blue Light before Bedtime Bad for Sleep QA Why Is Blue Light before Bedtime Bad for Sleep Two neuroscientists discuss how blue light negatively affects health and sleep patterns Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency National Heart, Lung Sleep deprivation DEP rih VA shun is a condition that occurs if you don t get enough sleep Sleep deficiency is a broader concept It occurs if you have one or of the following You don t get enough sleep sleep deprivation You sleep at the wrong time of day that is, you re out of sync with Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes BBC News My partner Milla and I were living in London when we had our first child, Jasper, so we weren t eligible for a free box But Milla s parents didn t want us to miss out, so they bought one and put it in the post Sleep and Health Surprising Reasons to Get More Sleep Continued Better memory Feeling forgetful Sleep loss could be to blame Studies have shown that while we sleep, our brains process Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Scientific American Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Research on naps, meditation, nature walks and the habits of exceptional artists and athletes reveals how mental breaks increase productivity, replenish attention, solidify memories and encourage creativity How Much Sleep Do We Really Need National Sleep Foundation Ever wondered how much sleep you really need The National Sleep Foundation has done extensive research and found out exactly how much you need at Consequences of Insufficient Sleep Healthy Sleep Most people don t get enough sleep We are a society that burns the candle at both ends, a nation where people stay up all night to study, work, or have fun National Sleep Foundation Sleep Research Education Explore the National Sleep foundation, your source for sleep research and education from sleep disorders and problems to polls and maximizing energy Surprising Health Benefits of Sleep Health How sleep benefits your heart, weight, mind, and Surprising Effects of Lack of Sleep WebMD You know lack of sleep can make you grumpy and foggy You may not know what it can do to your sex life, memory, health, looks, and ability to lose weight Here are surprising and serious effects of sleep loss Sleep Disorders in Elderly Sleeping Issues and Help my mother in law is in a resential care fac she has dementia and bad sundowners we need to find a sleeping aide to let her stayin bed at night or she has to leave her dr is against adavan or lorazapan which workd for others he only wand halodol she isnt eating only baby food etc any advice on what to give here is walking walking and Brain Basics Understanding Sleep National Institute of May , Sleep is an important part of your daily routine you spend about one third of your time doing it Quality sleep and getting enough of it at the right times is as essential to survival as food and water Without sleep you can t form or maintain the pathways in your brain that let you Toddler Sleep Reasons Toddlers Wake Up At Night Toddler sleep challenges keep us all up at night Here s four reasons one pediatric sleep expert thinks toddlers wake up QA Why Is Blue Light before Bedtime Bad for Sleep QA Why Is Blue Light before Bedtime Bad for Sleep Two neuroscientists discuss how blue light negatively affects health and sleep patterns Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency National Heart, Lung Sleep deprivation DEP rih VA shun is a condition that occurs if you don t get enough sleep Sleep deficiency is a broader concept It occurs if you have one or of the following You don t get enough sleep sleep deprivation You sleep at the wrong time of day that is, you re out of sync with Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes BBC News My partner Milla and I were living in London when we had our first child, Jasper, so we weren t eligible for a free box But Milla s parents didn t want us to miss out, so they bought one and put it in the post Sleep and Health Surprising Reasons to Get More Sleep Continued Better memory Feeling forgetful Sleep loss could be to blame Studies have shown that while we sleep, our brains process Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Scientific American Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Research on naps, meditation, nature walks and the habits of exceptional artists and athletes reveals how mental breaks increase productivity, replenish attention, solidify memories and encourage creativity How Much Sleep Do We Really Need National Sleep Foundation Ever wondered how much sleep you really need The National Sleep Foundation has done extensive research and found out exactly how much you need at Consequences of Insufficient Sleep Healthy Sleep Most people don t get enough sleep We are a society that burns the candle at both ends, a nation where people stay up all night to study, work, or have fun National Sleep Foundation Sleep Research Education Explore the National Sleep foundation, your source for sleep research and education from sleep disorders and problems to polls and maximizing energy Surprising Health Benefits of Sleep Health How sleep benefits your heart, weight, mind, and Surprising Effects of Lack of Sleep WebMD You know lack of sleep can make you grumpy and foggy You may not know what it can do to your sex life, memory, health, looks, and ability to lose weight Here are surprising and serious effects of sleep loss Sleep Disorders in Elderly Sleeping Issues and Help my mother in law is in a resential care fac she has dementia and bad sundowners we need to find a sleeping aide to let her stayin bed at night or she has to leave her dr is against adavan or lorazapan which workd for others he only wand halodol she isnt eating only baby food etc any advice on what to give here is walking walking and Brain Basics Understanding Sleep National Institute of May , Sleep is an important part of your daily routine you spend about one third of your time doing it Quality sleep and getting enough of it at the right times is as essential to survival as food and water Without sleep you can t form or maintain the pathways in your brain that let you Toddler Sleep Reasons Toddlers Wake Up At Night Toddler sleep challenges keep us all up at night Here s four reasons one pediatric sleep expert thinks toddlers wake up Your Ancestors Didn t Sleep Like You SlumberWise Once you go back before the s, sleep starts to look a lot different Your ancestors slept in a way that modern sleepers would find bizarre Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency National Heart, Lung Sleep deprivation DEP rih VA shun is a condition that occurs if you don t get enough sleep Sleep deficiency is a broader concept It occurs if Why Finnish babies sleep in cardboard boxes BBC News My partner Milla and I were living in London when we had our first child, Jasper, so we weren t eligible for a free box But Milla s parents didn t want us to miss out, so they bought one and put it in the post Sleep and Health Surprising Reasons to Get More Sleep Continued Better memory Feeling forgetful Sleep loss could be to blame Studies have shown that while we sleep, our brains process Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Scientific American Why Your Brain Needs More Downtime Research on naps, meditation, nature walks and the habits of exceptional artists and athletes reveals how mental breaks increase productivity, replenish attention, solidify memories and encourage creativity How Much Sleep Do We Really Need National Sleep Foundation View Larger Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well being We spend up to one third of our lives asleep, and the overall state of our sleep health remains an essential question throughout our lifespan Most of us know that getting a good night s sleep is important, but too few of us actually make those eight or so hours between Consequences of Insufficient Sleep Healthy Sleep Sleep is vital for learning and memory, and lack of sleep impacts our health, safety, and longevity Dr Orfeu Buxton describes how animal and human studies suggest that adequate sleep is crucial for a long and healthy life Most people don t get enough sleep We are a society that burns the National Sleep Foundation Sleep Research Education Explore the National Sleep foundation, your source for sleep research and education from sleep disorders and problems to polls and maximizing energy Surprising Health Benefits of Sleep Health Sleep makes you feel better, but its importance goes way beyond just boosting your mood or banishing under eye circles Adequate sleep is a key part of a healthy lifestyle, and can benefit your heart, weight, mind, and Surprising Effects of Lack of Sleep WebMD You know lack of sleep can make you grumpy and foggy You may not know what it can do to your sex life, memory, health, looks, and ability to lose weight Here are surprising and serious effects of sleep loss Sleep Disorders in Elderly Sleeping Issues and Help my mother in law is in a resential care fac she has dementia and bad sundowners we need to find a sleeping aide to let her stayin bed at night or she has to leave her dr is against adavan or lorazapan which workd for others he only wand halodol she isnt eating only baby food etc any advice on what to give here is walking walking and up and Brain Basics Understanding Sleep National Institute of May , Sleep is an important part of your daily routine you spend about one third of your time doing it Quality sleep and getting enough of it at the right times is as essential to survival as food and water Without sleep you can t form or maintain the pathways in your brain that let you Toddler Sleep Reasons Toddlers Wake Up At Night My son is the same way He will be next week I really don t know what to do any We have tried everything I have another baby due in a few weeks and I m terrified no one will sleep any Your Ancestors Didn t Sleep Like You SlumberWise Once you go back before the s, sleep starts to look a lot different Your ancestors slept in a way that modern sleepers would find bizarre I Doser Digital Doses I Doser helps you simulate a mood or experience on any device

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